Burnt Orange Filigree Pendant Knit Headband

So the time is coming (not here yet technically, at least in Chicago considering it is supposed to be 65 on Thanksgiving) soon where, if you haven’t already, we are going to have to dig out our hats/headbands and gloves and add them to our winter daily wardrobes. I really have always been  more of a fan of winter knit headbands than hats- they don’t mess up my hair if they have a button in the back so I can take them off and put them on without rubbing them against my hair, and they totally create less static. But, I have always had a hard time finding a knit headband that can double as an accessory, instead of looking like a unisex ugly fleece ski headband. So, after spending the last few winters trying to find a knit headband that could double as a cute accessory to my winter outerwear, I decided to start knitting my own. Yep, I knit. I’ve been thinking about buying a rocking chair and a cat to bat the yarn ball around but I’m allergic to cats and I hate rocking chairs so… that’s out. Anyways, a few years ago I finally started knitting my own headbands, and then began to make some for friends and relatives upon request.  They shared my problems of not being able to find a cute headband, and also not wanting to see a 10 year old boy wearing the exact same one once they settled on the generic unisex fleece headband that we all know we have owned at some point. Now that the weather is getting cold enough to wear these knit headbands, I thought that I’d add them to the lakeshore lavaliere winter line. Here is a burnt orange knit headband with a filigree & stone pendant that I made the other day:

 

The filigree layers come together to make a flower pendant, and I added an orange/copper patina to the second filigree layer to make it flow with the burnt orange color of the yarn. There is a wooden button closure in the back to put the headband on and take it off without creating a major hair static disaster. The yarn is thick and extremely warm- I have worn my other ones skiing and running in the dead of winter and my ears stayed nice and toasty.

Later today I’m going to add photos of the other colors of yarn available for this headband– I’ve been growing my yarn collection for about 5 years, so there are probably 50 other colors this headband can come in.

To access this listing in the lakeshore lavaliere online store, just click the pictures!

OR

go to etsy.com/shop/lakeshorelavaliere & shop and browse the other listings 

For Inquiries/Requests/Custom Orders, Contact: lakeshorelavaliere@gmail.com

OR Etsy Convo me by clicking ‘Contact’ in the toolbar on the left side of my shop page.

Thanks for reading!

DIY Coasters: Porcelain & Wood Sets

Last week, I posted about a featured designer, Sam Birch for her really cute String Art Project– this week, I am going to feature another art project of hers, and one of mine- different ways to make DIY COASTERS.

 Sam’s Porcelain Tile Coasters (from separate sets):

Materials:

1. Scrapbook Paper (Michael’s, Joann Fabrics, etc.)

2. Porcelain Tile (Home Depot ~$1.00)

3. Mod Podge (Michael’s, Joann Fabrics)

4. Mod Podge Sealer (Michael’s, Joann Fabrics)

5. Ruler

6. Scissors

7. Paint Brush/Sponge Brush (Michael’s, Home Depot, Joann Fabrics)

To Make Sam’s Porcelain Tile Coasters: 

Step 1:

Measure the tile with the ruler, or trace the tile face down on the back of the piece of scrapbook paper. If you want the porcelain to show and create a sort of matte border around the paper, use the ruler to measure the tile, then, when using the ruler to draw the square on the back of the scrapbook paper,  leave a centimeter or so on each side.

Step 2:

Cut the squares out, duh.

Step 3: 

Cover the Porcelain Tile in a layer of the Mod Podge and place the scrapbook paper over the Mod Podge layer on the porcelain tile. Cover the top of the piece of paper with Mod Podge as well.

Let it dry.

Step 4:

Spray the Mod Podge Sealer over the whole tile evenly.

Let it dry.

**While the regular Mod Podge should technically be enough, the sealer ensures that the paper will really harden onto the tile. Without the sealer, glasses with a lot of condensation on them kept sticking to the coasters. The sealer eliminated this issue.

Step 5:

Enjoy your coasters!

My Aged Wooden Tile Coasters (part of one large set requested by my mother):

Materials:

1. Scrapbook Paper (Michael’s, Joann Fabrics, etc.)

2. Wooden Block (Michael’s 3 for $1.00 on sale  $0.70 e/ when not )

3. Mod Podge- I used Antique, to create the, yep you guessed it, Antique look, but any Mod Podge will work. (Michael’s, Joann Fabrics)

4. Mod Podge Sealer (Michael’s, Joann Fabrics)

5. Ruler

6. Scissors

7. Paint Brush/Sponge Brush (Michael’s, Home Depot, Joann Fabrics)

8. Paint, two shades of green: Sage & Spanish Olive

9. Americana Weathered Wood Crackle (I used medium, I would suggest a stronger one for better effect)

Here is a picture of some of the materials I used ( and Sam too!)

To Make My Aged Wooden Tile Coasters: 

Step 1:

Cover the wooden tile in a layer of one of the paint colors. My first layer was Spanish Olive because I wanted the Sage to be more prominent.

Let it Dry.

Step 2:

Cover the wooden tile with a layer of the Wood Crackle.

Let it dry.

Step 3:

Cover the wooden tile with a layer of the second paint color. My second color was the Sage.

Let it dry.

**Steps 1-3 create the crackled wood effect, making the wood look aged and have a more antique appearance.

Step 4:

Measure the top of the wooden tile with the ruler- because the wood is carved in a sort of relief style, tracing it will not work. Trace the dimensions from measuring the wooden tile onto the back of the scrapbook paper.

Step 5:

Use common sense and cut them out.

Step 6: 

Cover the top of the wooden tile in a layer of the Mod Podge and place the scrapbook paper over the Mod Podge layer on the tile. Cover the top of the piece of paper with Mod Podge as well.

Let it Dry.

**I used the Antique Mod Podge because it creates the aged effect on the paper. (obvious I know, but still, thought I would let you know).

Step 7:

Spray the Mod Podge Sealer over the whole coaster.

Let Dry.

Step 8:

Enjoy your coaster- coasterS if you decide to make sense and make more than 1.

Sam gave our roommate and I the coasters pictured above as a gift- and we love them! I told my mother about the coasters Sam gave me, and she wanted a set immediately. They were fun and easy to make, and incredibly useful. We have a set in every room of our apartment, and my mother has the monster wooden set at my parents’ house.

Hope you enjoyed our project tutorials & liked our DIY coasters! 

Thanks for reading! Don’t forget to follow lakeshore lavaliere for more DIY tutorials and new jewelry pieces!

Featured Designer: Sam Birch & String Art Project

In addition to making jewelry and accessories for the lakeshore lavaliere line, I love to find cool new projects and crafts to do in my (extremely nonexistent) spare time. Yesterday, I saw this awesome creation done by a friend of mine, and I had to feature it on my site. I was lucky enough to get her to send me a little tutorial about the project to post on here, and I think you’ll all really love it!

Featured Designer: Sam Birch

Image

Project: String Art

         Image

Here is Sam’s step-by-step tutorial on how to make this awesome string art project: 

Supplies:
-Wood plaque
-Acrylic craft paints (optional)
-Paint brush or craft sponge
-Box of 1″ nails in the color of your choice – the size of your design will determine how many nails you will need.  Mine used 86 nails.
-Spools of “friendship bracelet” string in the color of your choice – again, the size of your design will determine how much you need.  I used about one and a half spools for mine.
-Hammer
Step 1:
Pick the size of wood that you want for your string art.  Craft stores like Michael’s or Hobby Lobby have pre-cut raw wood available in different shapes and sizes, and usually have the edges already beveled for you.  I bought mine from Michael’s and it’s 9″x11″.  If you can’t find a shape or size that is right for you, you can always cut a piece yourself!
Step 2:
Paint the wood the color of your choice… or just leave it plain!  I chose white so it took a couple of coats of craft acrylic paint in order to cover the wood grain.  Work on step 3 while you let it dry.
Step 3:
 Print out a map of your desired state or shape.  I found an outline of Illinois on googlemaps and it took me a few tries at the printer to get the perfect size to fit my wood.  I also drew the shape of a heart on the paper where I later hooked my string… it is supposed to be Chicago but considering Chicago is the top right hand corner of the state, the heart is actually around more like… Ottowa? Oh well.
Step 4:
 Cut out your desired shape leaving about a 1 inch paper border around shape you want to make.
Step 5:
When your paint is dry, position the paper stencil on the wood where you want your design.
Step 6:
Secure your stencil to your plaque.  I used tape, but it made it difficult to remove the paper after I was done.  Instead, I would suggest putting a nail in each corner of your state in order to keep the stencil in place.
Step 7:
Begin to hammer your nails through the paper outline and into the wood plaque.  I would suggest starting around the outline of the heart.  I did it the opposite way and started with the state first, which made it really difficult to hammer the tiny heart in at the end with all of those nails in the way.  Use your own judgment in terms of how close together your nails are.  The more nails you use, the fuller your string will look.  Once you have nailed down all of the nails, rip out the paper underneath it.
Step 8:  
This step is optional!! I chose to paint my nails gold (they were grey before) but if you didn’t steal them from your dad’s tool chest like me, you would have just bought the nails in the color you wanted to begin with.  If you do want to paint your nails a new color, just get a little brush and be careful not to get any paint on your newly painted wood!  Let them dry.
Step 9:
Finally, the fun part! Tie the end of your string in a knot around one of your nails.  Begin wrapping the string around the nails, alternating from an outer nail (the border of the state) to an inner nail (the outline of the heart).  You will need to use each of the inner nails more than once, as there are a lot more outer nails than inner nails.
Step 10:
Congrats, you’re done!! Either lean your string art up against a wall like me, or you can fasten a picture hanger to the back of the wood and hang it up.
Thanks Sam!
This string art & wood project can be done with different states, and even a bunch of different designs-
 I think that it would make for a great gift idea!
Follow the lakeshore lavaliere blog & Twitter/Pinterest for more jewelry, featured designers, tutorials, and DIY projects- Thanks for reading!